TREKS

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Difficulty: Moderate to Demanding:

Trekking requires cardiovascular endurance (via aerobic training), strength endurance (through strength conditioning), and hiking-specific training (via hiking with a pack). Being in strong physical shape is one of the most important aspects for success on a high altitude trek. During your training, you should be planning to progressively ramp up your speed, duration (time or mileage), and pack weight of weekly training hikes to give you hiking-specific conditioning that cannot be matched by any other sort of training. Daily training is an important part of preparation coupled with longer hikes on weekends. Please feel free to contact our office for further assistance in preparing for your trek.

OVERVIEW

 

  • Each item on the list below is required unless specified to be optional.
  • Item images represent one product suggestion for that item.
  • Our experienced staff is happy to speak with you via phone or email:  info@aconcaguamg.com

FOOTWEAR LIGHT HIKING BOOTS OR TREKKING SHOES For any approaches across dry trail. Light weight, high comfort, plenty of room in the toe box, and good support should be stressed here.
image001

 

WOOL OR SYNTHETIC SOCKS 2 or 3 pairs of medium to heavy hiking socks. These must fit over your liner socks if you plan to wear liner socks.
image003

 

WOOL OR SYNTHETIC SOCKS 2 pairs of lightweight liner socks. These must fit snugly and beneath your wool socks.
image005

 

HIKING BOOT
Waterproof hiking boots designed for hiking in cool to cold conditions. Modern, lightly insulated boots with room in the toe box and good support should be stressed. Models like the Scarpa Terra GTX are ideal.

 

BOOTIES (OPTIONAL) Synthetic or down camp booties for comfortable wear around camp.

 

TECHNICAL CLOTHING (Lower body)

 

SHORT UNDERWEAR Two to three pairs based on personal preference. Synthetic or wool fabrics only; bring a comfortable athletic style for any top and bottom underwear.

BASELAYER BOTTOM 1 to 2 non-cotton baselayer bottoms that should fit snugly without constriction.

 

SOFTSHELL PANTS (Optional) Stretchy, comfortable, non-insulated softshell pants which should fit comfortably with or without your baselayer bottoms. Please note that “zip-off”-style trekking pants are too light to be considered softshell pants.

 

HARDSHELL PANTS Non-insulated, fully waterproof shell pants that must fit comfortably over your baselayer bottoms and softshell pants. Full-length separating size zippers are preferred; shorter side zippers are allowed if you can put on and take off your pants without removing your boots.

 

TREKKING PANTS Lightweight, breathable trekking pants are recommended for the approach to base camp. Many choose to use zip-off versions for versatility.

 

SHORTS (OPTIONAL) Comfortable, non-cotton athletic shorts can be nice during the trek, at base camp, or during river crossings.

 

TECHNICAL CLOTHING (upper body)

 

BASELAYER TOP 2 long-sleeved baselayer tops. Baselayers must be constructed of a non-cotton material such as merino wool or polyester. Note that many guides prefer light-colored, hooded baselayers for sun protection.

 

MIDLAYER TOP A mid-weight, form-fitting, lightweight fleece layer for use over baselayers or as a baselayer in cold conditions. Hoods are optional but recommended.

 

LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATED JACKET We recommend a lightweight insulated jacket to serve either as a layering piece or as stand-alone insulation when appropriate. This may be filled with down or synthetic insulation. This jacket often referred to as puffy jacket.


 

SOFTSHELL JACKET This breathable but wind-and-weather resistant jacket is a key part of a mountaineering layering system. We recommend a hooded model. This layer must fit well over your midlayer top and baselayer top.

 

HARDSHELL JACKET A non-insulated, fully waterproof shell jacket with a hood. We recommend durable 3-layer fabric. Gore-Tex Pro Shell or a similar eVent fabric will offer the most durability and long-term weather protection. This layer must fit comfortably over your baselayer, midlayer, softshell, and potentially a lightweight insulated layer. Helmet-compatible hoods are required.

 

T-SHIRTS Bring a small selection of t-shirts as well, for use around town and for the trek into basecamp.

 

HANDWEAR

 

LIGHTWEIGHT LINER GLOVES 2 pairs of very lightweight wool or synthetic liner gloves that offer a snug, comfortable fit. Lighter colors absorb less sunlight while still offering UV protection. Black or dark-color gloves are also acceptable.

 

SOFTSHELL GLOVES Midweight, lightly insulated gloves for use when mittens are too warm and liner gloves are not warm enough. Leather-palm construction is always ideal for the sake of durability.

 

HEADWEAR

 

BUFF 2 buffs are must-have for Aconcagua. The UV Buff is a versatile replacement for the bandana and serves a multitude of purposes.

 

SUN HAT Any style of lightweight hat for shading the head will work well. Baseball caps and sombrero-style sun hats are the most common.

 

WOOL / SYNTHETIC SKI HAT A non-cotton wool or synthetic hat that covers the head and ears comfortably.

 

GLACIER GLASSES High-quality glacier glasses offering full coverage around both eyes and across the nose. Removable side-shields are not required provided eye coverage is sufficient.

DUST MASK (OPTIONAL) For those that are sensitive to dust. Can be left at Base Camp.

 

CLIMBING EQUIPMENT

 

TREKKING POLES Collapsible trekking poles.  Fit for your height and weight

 

PACKS

 

TREKKING PACK (OPTIONAL) A small, simple pack of approximately 35-40 liters. Useful for the trek into basecamp.

EXPEDITION DUFFEL BAG An approximately 150-liter expedition-ready duffel bag used to transport all gear.

 

SMALL DUFFEL This item can double as carry-on luggage for your flight, and is used to store any items you do not plan to take into the mountains. Think light and simple, with 40-50 liters of total capacity. Bring a travel lock for peace of mind.

 

SLEEPING GEAR

 

20F DOWN SLEEPING BAG This sleeping bag should be rated to 20F (-8 C) degrees Be sure to include a correctly sized compression stuff sack.

 

INFLATABLE SLEEPING PAD A full-length, modern inflatable sleeping pad is recommended. Older-style three-quarter length pads have been superseded by ultralight full-length pads. We recommend bringing a valve repair/body patch kit.

 

FOAM PAD This pad should be either 3/4 or body length. Cut pieces of closed cell foam or industrially-crafted pads are both acceptable.

 

PERSONAL EQUIPMENT

 

HEADLAMP A modern outdoor LED headlamp offering 90-200 lumens of output. Fresh, installed batteries plus spare batteries. Weather-resistant models are strongly preferred.

 

WATER BOTTLES (Two to three 1-litre capacity bottles) or HYDRATION RESERVOIR (2 or 3 liter capacity) Bottles should be wide mouth made of copolyester (BPA free plastic).

 

TOILETRY BAG Include toilet paper (one roll stored in a plastic bag), hand sanitizer, toothbrush, toothpaste, floss, and some wet wipes if desired.

 

SUNSCREEN Several 1-2 ounce tubes of SPF 30+ sunscreen. Zinc-oxide added versions are preferred. One ounce is typically sufficient per week, but several tubes. Sunscreen loses SPF rating over time; we strongly recommend brand-new sunscreen.

 

LIPSCREEN Several tubes of SPF 30+ lipscreen. As with sunscreen, be sure your lipscreen is new. Recommended: Aloe Gator Medicated 30 SPF Lip Balm.

 

WATER PURIFICATION TABLETS One set of chemical water treatment drops or tablets. We recommend AquaMira. Lightweight Steri-Pens with extra batteries can suffice, but do not work well in the event of very cold conditions. Be sure your system will be sufficient for the entire duration of your trip- some packages of tablets treat only a very small amount of water! As a general guideline, allow for 4-6 liters of water per day when treating water is necessary.

 

SMALL PERSONAL FIRST-AID KIT Basic medical supplies in a compact package- we recommend basic painkillers, Moleskin, first-aid tape, Band-Aids, and anti-septic wipes or gel.

MEDICATIONS & PRESCRIPTIONS Bring any personal prescriptions, plus Pepto Bismol, Cipro (500mg tablets), Metronidazole, Z-Paks (250mg tablets), Diamox (125mg tablets, approx. 2 per day at altitude), and a variety of standard painkillers like Excedrin Extra Strength, Ibuprofen, etc.

 

HAND SANITIZER Many alcohol-based hand cleaners will work well. Bring a small amount appropriate to the trip duration.

 

 

OPTIONAL ITEMS

 

CAMERA Optional. Small point-and-shoot cameras (including compact SLR’s) are ideal & work well at altitude. Alternatively, many opt to use a smartphone camera. Due to weight & care in the mountain environment, large dSLR cameras are discouraged.

 

PEE BOTTLE (1-1.5 LITER) One wide-mouth, clearly marked collapsible container or wide-mouthed bottle for use overnight.

 

PEE FUNNEL (FOR WOMEN) Practice is critical for the use of this item.

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FOOD We recommend that you bring approximately 12 energy food items, like bars, Gu packets, etc.

 

TRASH COMPACTOR BAGS Three bags for use as waterproof pack/stuff sack liners. Compactor bags are made from a heavy plastic and stand up well to prolonged mountain use.

 

EARPLUGS Several pairs of disposable foam earplugs are highly recommended to aid sleep- this is especially important on windy nights when a flapping tent can easily keep you awake.

 

TRAVEL CLOTHES Clean ‘town’ clothing is recommend for use traveling as well as pre-and-post trip. We recommend bringing a comfortable variety of clothing for peace of mind, including some t-shirts, and swimsuit.

 

TRAVEL POWER ADAPTER Type C (two round prongs) and Type I (three flat prongs, two of which are angled) are most common. Please research what adapters are necessary to plug in your devices.

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[vryn_layout_shortcode id=”26765″]
[vryn_layout_shortcode id=”26990″]

Difficulty: Moderate to Demanding:

Trekking requires cardiovascular endurance (via aerobic training), strength endurance (through strength conditioning), and hiking-specific training (via hiking with a pack). Being in strong physical shape is one of the most important aspects for success on a high altitude trek. During your training, you should be planning to progressively ramp up your speed, duration (time or mileage), and pack weight of weekly training hikes to give you hiking-specific conditioning that cannot be matched by any other sort of training. Daily training is an important part of preparation coupled with longer hikes on weekends. Please feel free to contact our office for further assistance in preparing for your trek.

OVERVIEW

  • Each item on the list below is required unless specified to be optional.
  • Item images represent one product suggestion for that item.
  • Our experienced staff is happy to speak with you via phone or email:  info@aconcaguamg.com

FOOTWEAR LIGHT HIKING BOOTS OR TREKKING SHOES For any approaches across dry trail. Light weight, high comfort, plenty of room in the toe box, and good support should be stressed here. image001   WOOL OR SYNTHETIC SOCKS 2 or 3 pairs of medium to heavy hiking socks. These must fit over your liner socks if you plan to wear liner socks. image003   WOOL OR SYNTHETIC SOCKS 2 pairs of lightweight liner socks. These must fit snugly and beneath your wool socks. image005   HIKING BOOT Waterproof hiking boots designed for hiking in cool to cold conditions. Modern, lightly insulated boots with room in the toe box and good support should be stressed. Models like the Scarpa Terra GTX are ideal.   BOOTIES (OPTIONAL) Synthetic or down camp booties for comfortable wear around camp.   TECHNICAL CLOTHING (Lower body)   SHORT UNDERWEAR Two to three pairs based on personal preference. Synthetic or wool fabrics only; bring a comfortable athletic style for any top and bottom underwear. BASELAYER BOTTOM 1 to 2 non-cotton baselayer bottoms that should fit snugly without constriction.   SOFTSHELL PANTS (Optional) Stretchy, comfortable, non-insulated softshell pants which should fit comfortably with or without your baselayer bottoms. Please note that “zip-off”-style trekking pants are too light to be considered softshell pants.   HARDSHELL PANTS Non-insulated, fully waterproof shell pants that must fit comfortably over your baselayer bottoms and softshell pants. Full-length separating size zippers are preferred; shorter side zippers are allowed if you can put on and take off your pants without removing your boots.   TREKKING PANTS Lightweight, breathable trekking pants are recommended for the approach to base camp. Many choose to use zip-off versions for versatility.   SHORTS (OPTIONAL) Comfortable, non-cotton athletic shorts can be nice during the trek, at base camp, or during river crossings.   TECHNICAL CLOTHING (upper body)   BASELAYER TOP 2 long-sleeved baselayer tops. Baselayers must be constructed of a non-cotton material such as merino wool or polyester. Note that many guides prefer light-colored, hooded baselayers for sun protection.   MIDLAYER TOP A mid-weight, form-fitting, lightweight fleece layer for use over baselayers or as a baselayer in cold conditions. Hoods are optional but recommended.   LIGHTWEIGHT INSULATED JACKET We recommend a lightweight insulated jacket to serve either as a layering piece or as stand-alone insulation when appropriate. This may be filled with down or synthetic insulation. This jacket often referred to as puffy jacket.   SOFTSHELL JACKET This breathable but wind-and-weather resistant jacket is a key part of a mountaineering layering system. We recommend a hooded model. This layer must fit well over your midlayer top and baselayer top.   HARDSHELL JACKET A non-insulated, fully waterproof shell jacket with a hood. We recommend durable 3-layer fabric. Gore-Tex Pro Shell or a similar eVent fabric will offer the most durability and long-term weather protection. This layer must fit comfortably over your baselayer, midlayer, softshell, and potentially a lightweight insulated layer. Helmet-compatible hoods are required.   T-SHIRTS Bring a small selection of t-shirts as well, for use around town and for the trek into basecamp.   HANDWEAR   LIGHTWEIGHT LINER GLOVES 2 pairs of very lightweight wool or synthetic liner gloves that offer a snug, comfortable fit. Lighter colors absorb less sunlight while still offering UV protection. Black or dark-color gloves are also acceptable.   SOFTSHELL GLOVES Midweight, lightly insulated gloves for use when mittens are too warm and liner gloves are not warm enough. Leather-palm construction is always ideal for the sake of durability.   HEADWEAR   BUFF 2 buffs are must-have for Aconcagua. The UV Buff is a versatile replacement for the bandana and serves a multitude of purposes.   SUN HAT Any style of lightweight hat for shading the head will work well. Baseball caps and sombrero-style sun hats are the most common.   WOOL / SYNTHETIC SKI HAT A non-cotton wool or synthetic hat that covers the head and ears comfortably.   GLACIER GLASSES High-quality glacier glasses offering full coverage around both eyes and across the nose. Removable side-shields are not required provided eye coverage is sufficient. DUST MASK (OPTIONAL) For those that are sensitive to dust. Can be left at Base Camp.   CLIMBING EQUIPMENT   TREKKING POLES Collapsible trekking poles.  Fit for your height and weight   PACKS   TREKKING PACK (OPTIONAL) A small, simple pack of approximately 35-40 liters. Useful for the trek into basecamp. EXPEDITION DUFFEL BAG An approximately 150-liter expedition-ready duffel bag used to transport all gear.   SMALL DUFFEL This item can double as carry-on luggage for your flight, and is used to store any items you do not plan to take into the mountains. Think light and simple, with 40-50 liters of total capacity. Bring a travel lock for peace of mind.   SLEEPING GEAR   20F DOWN SLEEPING BAG This sleeping bag should be rated to 20F (-8 C) degrees Be sure to include a correctly sized compression stuff sack.   INFLATABLE SLEEPING PAD A full-length, modern inflatable sleeping pad is recommended. Older-style three-quarter length pads have been superseded by ultralight full-length pads. We recommend bringing a valve repair/body patch kit.   FOAM PAD This pad should be either 3/4 or body length. Cut pieces of closed cell foam or industrially-crafted pads are both acceptable.   PERSONAL EQUIPMENT   HEADLAMP A modern outdoor LED headlamp offering 90-200 lumens of output. Fresh, installed batteries plus spare batteries. Weather-resistant models are strongly preferred.   WATER BOTTLES (Two to three 1-litre capacity bottles) or HYDRATION RESERVOIR (2 or 3 liter capacity) Bottles should be wide mouth made of copolyester (BPA free plastic).   TOILETRY BAG Include toilet paper (one roll stored in a plastic bag), hand sanitizer, toothbrush, toothpaste, floss, and some wet wipes if desired.   SUNSCREEN Several 1-2 ounce tubes of SPF 30+ sunscreen. Zinc-oxide added versions are preferred. One ounce is typically sufficient per week, but several tubes. Sunscreen loses SPF rating over time; we strongly recommend brand-new sunscreen.   LIPSCREEN Several tubes of SPF 30+ lipscreen. As with sunscreen, be sure your lipscreen is new. Recommended: Aloe Gator Medicated 30 SPF Lip Balm.   WATER PURIFICATION TABLETS One set of chemical water treatment drops or tablets. We recommend AquaMira. Lightweight Steri-Pens with extra batteries can suffice, but do not work well in the event of very cold conditions. Be sure your system will be sufficient for the entire duration of your trip- some packages of tablets treat only a very small amount of water! As a general guideline, allow for 4-6 liters of water per day when treating water is necessary.   SMALL PERSONAL FIRST-AID KIT Basic medical supplies in a compact package- we recommend basic painkillers, Moleskin, first-aid tape, Band-Aids, and anti-septic wipes or gel. MEDICATIONS & PRESCRIPTIONS Bring any personal prescriptions, plus Pepto Bismol, Cipro (500mg tablets), Metronidazole, Z-Paks (250mg tablets), Diamox (125mg tablets, approx. 2 per day at altitude), and a variety of standard painkillers like Excedrin Extra Strength, Ibuprofen, etc.   HAND SANITIZER Many alcohol-based hand cleaners will work well. Bring a small amount appropriate to the trip duration.     OPTIONAL ITEMS   CAMERA Optional. Small point-and-shoot cameras (including compact SLR’s) are ideal & work well at altitude. Alternatively, many opt to use a smartphone camera. Due to weight & care in the mountain environment, large dSLR cameras are discouraged.   PEE BOTTLE (1-1.5 LITER) One wide-mouth, clearly marked collapsible container or wide-mouthed bottle for use overnight.   PEE FUNNEL (FOR WOMEN) Practice is critical for the use of this item.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

FOOD We recommend that you bring approximately 12 energy food items, like bars, Gu packets, etc.   TRASH COMPACTOR BAGS Three bags for use as waterproof pack/stuff sack liners. Compactor bags are made from a heavy plastic and stand up well to prolonged mountain use.   EARPLUGS Several pairs of disposable foam earplugs are highly recommended to aid sleep- this is especially important on windy nights when a flapping tent can easily keep you awake.   TRAVEL CLOTHES Clean ‘town’ clothing is recommend for use traveling as well as pre-and-post trip. We recommend bringing a comfortable variety of clothing for peace of mind, including some t-shirts, and swimsuit.   TRAVEL POWER ADAPTER Type C (two round prongs) and Type I (three flat prongs, two of which are angled) are most common. Please research what adapters are necessary to plug in your devices.

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Beltrán 352 | Godoy Cruz | Mendoza | Argentina | 5501

info@aconcaguamg.com | +54 9 261 471 1664